Managing gender transition in the workplace | #eBizInsights

Transgender.jpg

man holding pieces of jigsaw puzzle. business matching concept. crowd sourcing. freelancer. teleworking.

Managing gender transition in the workplace

Even though the South African constitution is regarded as one of the most progressive in the world, LGBTQI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning, and intersex) employees continue to experience discrimination and harassment. Ian McAlister, General Manager of CRS Technologies, examines how an organisation can create an enabling environment to mitigate the risk of this happening.

“Globally, there is increasing awareness around LGBTQI issues. Unfortunately, when discussions focus on the workplace, things take a decidedly muted turn. Despite the protection afforded by the constitution, those in the LGBTQI community continue to be passed over for promotion, have their work duties limited to avoid any client-facing engagements, and are openly ridiculed by their colleagues,” says McAlister.

The issues become more complex when companies have transgender employees who either just ‘came out’ or are in the process of making a transition. For example, what must be done if a transitioning male employee wants to use the female bathroom? Many of the female employees might object, leaving the person in a difficult position.

While disclosure reduces the stress of hiding one’s gender identity and enables the employee to develop more genuine relationships with colleagues, clients, and superiors, there are some risks associated with this.

A lack of understanding or acceptance from colleagues could result in negative changes in self-confidence. Relationships in the office could become tense and the employee may even become the focus of office gossip. Additionally, transphobia, harassment, discrimination, violence, and dismissals continue to take place, even though all are illegal.

“If an organisation wants to build a more inclusive environment, there are certain aspects to be mindful of when it comes to LGBTQI employees,” says McAlister. “These steps are designed to protect all employees and create a more enabling culture inside the business which will result in a more productive and effective organisation.”

Fundamentally, every business has a responsibility to ensure that workplaces are safe and supportive of LGBTQI employees. When it comes to developing policies and procedures, adopting LGBTQI inclusion as an overriding principle is a good start, but is just one part of the process.

Companies must assess their existing level of inclusion, review current policies and disciplinary processes for those discriminating against others, and evaluate any gaps between the polices and what is practised inside the organisation.

“Respecting the privacy of employees, regardless of their sexual orientation, should be a guiding principle. Additionally, the policies focused on inclusivity (when it comes to bathroom use and dress codes) should be published on the corporate intranet and at strategic locations around the office. In this way, people can educate themselves and become more aware of the complexities of the issues at hand.”

Furthermore, employers can identify potential activities that can bring staff together for discussions around these policies and procedures. This could be used as instructional sessions that are focused on building a culture of inclusivity.

“The modern work environment is definitely a more empowering one than in the past. However, ongoing education and communication must be key drivers to ensure all employees are adequately taken care of. When people start feeling misunderstood or uncomfortable in the workplace because of their gender, this must be addressed immediately to avoid any negative impact on the people and ultimately, the business,” McAlister concludes.

Watch the webinar here:  https://youtu.be/lzz8WI8GAI0

CRS boilerplate

CRS Technologies is a leading provider of solutions and services to the growing human resources (HR) and human capital management (HCM) industries.

Following its establishment in 1985, the Johannesburg-based company quickly found its niche in the HR, people management and payroll sector and soon matured into the specialist of choice for blue chip organisations and SMMEs throughout Africa.

Today CRS is acknowledged as the most proficient HR and payroll solutions company on the continent, underpinned by solutions and services that help create workplaces of engaged and committed employees. Our approach to market is about maximising value between employer and employee, integrated with innovative technology that optimises people and grows businesses.

CRS achieves competitive advantage through its commitment to global best practice in HCM and its drive to transform HR departments into strategic, valued-added business units, be it through bespoke software and services or shared industry insight.

About eBizRadio

eBizRadio is a live multi- platformed social media service providing an online forum to the business community for holding conversations on the key issues related to specific businesses as well as availing a space for cross-business collaboration in response to key issues affecting the world of business. The place to go if you want to know about business and lifestyle
Don't be shellfish...Share on Reddit
Reddit
0Tweet about this on Twitter
Twitter
Share on Facebook
Facebook
0Email this to someone
email
Share on LinkedIn
Linkedin
eBizRadio

eBizRadio

eBizRadio is a live multi- platformed social media service providing an online forum to the business community for holding conversations on the key issues related to specific businesses as well as availing a space for cross-business collaboration in response to key issues affecting the world of business. The place to go if you want to know about business and lifestyle

scroll to top

Login

Please enter the correct answer: *


Register | Lost your password?